Buy Back Bermuda Round 2

Three years have gone by since we launched our first campaign, and we feel that we have enough energy and sufficient public support to save more green space from development. The Bermuda National Trust and The Bermuda Audubon Society invite you to help purchase and safeguard precious open space.

Our target this time is $2.5 million and we have identified two valuable properties - the first in Southampton, 7.6 acres next to Evans Bay Pond, and the second, 3.36 acres in Hamilton Parish, near Shelly Bay - almost 11 acres in total.

Your actions will result in ‘saving some open green space’ for current and future generations to enjoy. We hope that all concerned residents, young and old, local and international companies and even visitors, will help us with this, our Second Campaign, by making a financial contribution to this cause - regardless of how small the amount.

Please read our Brochure and complete the attached form and return it to us with your donation. All contributors will have their names recorded for prosperity on a monument to be constructed on the sites for all to see. The Committee and especially future generations of residents of Bermuda will be indebted to you for your foresight and generosity.

Bermuda Slave Registers from 1821 and 1834

The Ombudsman for Bermuda, Arlene Brock, has made available two extensive databases made from the 1821 and 1834 Slave Registers which are held in the Bermuda Archives. The original hand-written Registers were created to facilitate compensation for slave-owners when the slaves would be emancipated. They provide a unique record and valuable research tool for many people who are tracing family or community history.

The databases were developed in searchable Excel format by Dr. Virginia Bernhard of the University of St. Thomas in Houston. They set out the names of owners, the total number of slaves and sex of the owners, the names of slaves, their sex, colour and work. Sadly they do not record the ages and birth places of the slaves, which are therefore only available from the originals on microfilm in the Bermuda Archives. Dr. Bernhard wanted to make these research tools available to the public, and the Bermuda Ombudsman has done so by releasing them to the Trust and two other organisations in Bermuda. In turning these databases over to the Ombudsman, Dr. Bernhard stated: "The Slave Registers are such a treasure. I have no objection to making the databases public - this is my way of saying thank you to Bermuda ". However, she stressed: "these are academic working lists. They are not perfect - there are some gaps and spelling errors". The Archives are developing their own Slave Register database, but in the meantime the databases developed by Dr Bernhard will serve as useful tools for researchers.

TOP